TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

The Mystery of Human Uniqueness

What, exactly, makes our biology special?

If you dropped a dozen human toddlers on a beautiful Polynesian island with shelter and enough to eat, but no computers, no cell phones, and no metal tools, would they grow up to be like humans we recognize or like other primates? Would they invent language? Without the magic sauce of culture and technology, would humans be that different from chimpanzees?

Nobody knows. (Ethics bars the toddler test.) Since the early 1970s, scientists across the biological sciences keep stumbling on the same hint over and over again: we're different but not nearly as different as we thought. Neuroscientists, geneticists, and anthropologists have all given the question of human uniqueness a go, seeking special brain regions, unique genes, and human-specific behaviors, and, instead, finding more evidence for common threads across species.

Continued here


TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

Advertisers of the day

OK Play Healthcare: Prepare for a new way of life with us

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.

You are here: Home Opinion The Mystery of Human Uniqueness