TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

A Brief Exercise to Spur Innovation on Your Team

Your business needs it, you ask employees for it, you incent them to deliver it, but in the end, do you really get it? I'm talking about innovation. When the Conference Board queried CEOs in 2018, it found that one of their most important concerns was "creating new business models to adapt to disruptive technologies."

Unfortunately, many companies, even those with innovative histories, struggle to keep up with the torrid pace of change in their industries. This past fall, for instance, Starbucks, an organization widely regarded as nimble and forward-looking, announced a restructuring, with CEO Kevin Johnson emphasizing the need to "increase the velocity of innovation."

Established businesses have trouble innovating for many reasons, including siloed structures, fuzzy strategies, inadequate talent, and not enough funding. "Softer" factors also come into play, for example, a team or corporate culture that fails to give employees the time and space they need to think creatively.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

10 Habits Of Unsuccessful People You Don't Want To Copy

I never met a successful person until I was 24. I grew up in a working-class family - I was more frequently around people who were the opposite.

The first successful person I met was an entrepreneur in his forties. When I started my first real business, he was one of my first clients. When I met him, he was slightly overweight, had more money than he could count, and was merry all the time.

But he also lost his wife, the love of his life, a half decade before. We became friends. He told me that you never really "get over it." Even though he experienced tragedy - he still had a positive outlook on life and did good things.

He truly cared about others. I have to be honest, my first business wasn't great, but he still gave me a chance to do business with him.

He always said, "I just try to avoid being unsuccessful." That is the number one thing I learned from him. He said that you should study what makes you unsuccessful, unhappy, broke, fat, stupid. Then, eliminate those things out of your life.

To this day, I still live by that advice. I like his concept of trying not to be unsuccessful. Because what is success? One of the best definition that I've found comes from Bob Dylan, my favorite musician of all time

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Top Harvard Psychologist Steven Pinker: Go Ahead and Get Emotional in Negotiations

Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker is clearly a brilliant guy. Besides being a star at one of the world's top universities, he's written a string of bestsellers (one of which is Bill Gates's favorite book of all time), and dispenses some of the best, pithiest writing advice you'll ever hear. But even the smartest folks in the world are baffled sometimes.

On Big Think recently, Pinker admits one thing that confused him was negotiations. Why do we blow up conversations, storm away from good offers, or stubbornly stick to demands when both parties would benefit from compromise? This goes against basic psychological logic that people generally do what helps them the most.

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