TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

How to Help Your Team with Burnout When You’re Burned Out Yourself


As a manager, you want to do right by your employees and support them through intense work periods so they don't get burned out. But this can be a challenge when you're feeling overly stressed yourself. How can you take care of yourself so that you have the time and energy to support your team? What steps do you need to take to reduce your stress level? And what actions can you take to improve your team members' well-being?

What the Experts Say
It's tough to find the energy you need to help others when you yourself are at your limits. Burnout - as opposed to more run-of-the-mill stress - can cause you to "feel utterly depleted," says Susan David, a founder of the Harvard/McLean Institute of Coaching and author of Emotional Agility. And it "can permeate all aspects of your life. You are overtired and under-exercised; you're not attentive to food and nutrition; and you're disconnected from relationships." But it's not just you who suffers. "Your team is picking up on your stress, and it's making everything worse," says Whitney Johnson, the author of Build an A-Team: Play to Their Strengths and Lead Them Up the Learning Curve. So for the sake of both your health and the health of your employees, you need to summon all the resources you can to improve matters. Here's how to do that.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Is Congestion Pricing the Solution to our Traffic Woes?


Everyone complains about traffic. It takes too long to get where you need to go, and no one can provide a real estimate on the time it takes to get from point A to B in most major cities - and it's getting worse.

But what if there were a solution that could not only help fix traffic, but also provide much-needed dollars for upgrades to subways, buses, and other parts of our nation's crumbling infrastructure, thus creating more sustainable cities?

Fortunately, this seemingly magical solution could already exist in the form of congestion pricing. Congestion charges can help drivers better get where they need to go faster, and the money collected can be used for public transit upgrades and maintenance - further alleviating the strain on roads by offering people real transportation options.

Done well, this type of system could also help get cars off the street, reduce traffic, and help the environment, thus making cities better for people.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Productivity Isn't About Time Management. It's About Attention Management.

We live in a culture obsessed with personal productivity. We devour books on getting things done and dream of four-hour workweeks. We worship at the altar of hustle and boast about being busy. The key to getting things done, we're often told, is time management. If you could just plan your schedule better, you could reach productivity nirvana.

But after two decades of studying productivity, I've become convinced that time management is not a solution - it's actually part of the problem.

Often our productivity struggles are caused not by a lack of efficiency, but a lack of motivation. Productivity isn't a virtue. It's a means to an end. It's only virtuous if the end is worthy. If productivity is your goal, you have to rely on willpower to push yourself to get a task done. If you pay attention to why you're excited about the project and who will benefit from it, you'll be naturally pulled into it by intrinsic motivation.

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