TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Only 6 Percent of Ideas Become Commercial Successes. Here's How to Increase Your Odds

You probably spend a lot of time on idea generation--a necessary thing to do.

You might even be spending too much time coming up with ideas and not enough figuring out how to evaluate them. You want to select the best ideas--not just any idea. Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg didn't generate their business-launching ideas. They picked them.

This over-emphasis on idea generation is confirmed by 2012 research from the German University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, which found a "lack of research in the field of idea evaluation... and that the appropriate evaluation instruments are missing."

Idea evaluation is hard work. According to existing literature, only 6 percent of all "official" ideas and 14 percent of promising ideas that reach a development phase become commercial successes.

There are plenty of strategies out there for selecting the best ideas. They'll only take you so far if you don't understand these four fundamental principles for idea evaluation:

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day, for the top stories!

Advertisers of the day
INSEAD: The INSEAD Leadership Programme for Senior Executives - India
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.

TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Memories of your parents may have long-term health effects

Your perceptions of your parents directly affects your physical health and wellness, according to new research. And regardless if they are true, you might be stuck with them for life.

"There are things that happen to us in life that can alter our perceptions of the past, but it's not always the objective- or what actually happened - that really affects us," says lead author William Chopik, psychology professor at Michigan State University.

"What really impacts adults is how we psychologically interpret things and create memories. In short: our memories of our childhood predicted health and depression even though they may not even be based in reality," Chopik says.

Chopik's findings, which appear in Health Psychology, revealed that mere perceptions put mental and physical health on the line for decades to come. Your memories, Chopik explains, might be the key to lifelong health and happiness.

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day, for the top stories!

Advertisers of the day
INSEAD: The INSEAD Leadership Programme for Senior Executives - India
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.

TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

The key to loving your job in the age of burnout

In 2009, two US professors set out to study zookeepers and aquarium workers in an effort to discover what kept them motivated at work.

The results pointed to an overwhelming similarity: The keepers gained a deep sense of meaning from their jobs. It didn't matter that caring for animals was extremely badly paid and offered little career advancement, or that many of the actual tasks involved could be classified as "dirty work" - cleaning up feces, chopping vegetables, scrubbing floors. The zookeepers, most of whom were highly educated, felt that they were fulfilling a calling, and in doing so were extremely dedicated, often volunteering for months before even beginning to be paid, and rarely quitting.

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day, for the top stories!

Advertisers of the day
INSEAD: The INSEAD Leadership Programme for Senior Executives - India
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.

Subcategories

You are here: Home Opinion