TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Inside the airline industry's meltdown

Coronavirus has hit few sectors harder than air travel, wiping out tens of thousands of jobs and uncountable billions in revenue. While most fleets were grounded, the industry was forced to reimagine its future

When an airline no longer wants a plane, it is sent away to a boneyard, a storage facility where it sits outdoors on a paved lot, wingtip to wingtip with other unwanted planes. From the air, the planes look like the bleached remains of some long-forgotten skeleton. Europe's biggest boneyard is built on the site of a late-30s airfield in Teruel, in eastern Spain, where the dry climate is kind to metallic airframes. Many planes are here for short-term storage, biding their time while they change owners or undergo maintenance. If their future is less clear, they enter long-term storage. Sometimes a plane's limbo ends when it is taken apart, its body rendered efficiently down into spare parts and recycled metal.

In February, Patrick Lecer, the CEO of Tarmac Aerosave, the company that owns the Teruel boneyard and three others in France, had one eye cocked towards China. Lecer has been in aviation long enough to remember flights being grounded during the Sars epidemic in 2003. This year, when the coronavirus spread beyond Asia, he knew what was coming. "We started making space in our sites, playing Tetris with the aircraft to free up two or three or four more spaces in each," he told me.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

How I built this! -- Khan Academy: Sal Khan

Before Byjus and the scores of other edtech companies out there, there was Khan Academy, with grants from Bill Gates, Google as well as $10 to $50 donations from millions of appreciative students and parents. Khan Academy remains a non-profit till date. This 1.5 hour podcast by Guy Raz goes through the life story of founder Sal Khan, and pivotal moments in the building of Khan Academy, which crossed 100 million registered users during the pandemic. Listen at leisure

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Winner, winner, chicken dinner: The incredible growth story of Licious

In an 'informal economy' country like India, formalization will lead to a lot of startup opportunities. Sometimes, you just have to hang in there and keep doing what you are doing and wait for the market to reach you. That's what has happened with Licious. At the beginning of the pandemic, rumours about chicken carrying the virus screwed with their happiness, but then the non-vegetarians who wanted their meat preferred to order from a clean organized player like Licious than the local butcher. Result, their sales have gone up 300%!

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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Kellogg ExecEd: Kellogg Digital Transformation Program | Network with Global Peers | Apply Now

Emeritus : PG Diploma in Digital Business by Emeritus in collaboration with MIT Sloan & Columbia Business School Executive Education | Accepting Applications

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