TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

What this 100-year-old restaurant can teach CEOs about balancing resilience and profit

Joe's Stone Crab is the top-grossing independent restaurant in the U.S. It's been succeeding for a century because it pays its employees and suppliers exceptionally well - and is willing to experiment.

Joe's Stone Crab of Miami Beach is a rarity: an American restaurant that has prospered for over a century. It is currently the top-grossing independent restaurant in America - despite being the only restaurant in the top 100 that closes for three (and it used to be five) months per year when its principal fare, stone crab, is out of season. Its annual gross is 4% greater than that of the second-place competitor, but its monthly gross is 39% greater. In a trendy business sector in which the median age of the next 10 restaurants on the top 100 list is 27 years, its 100-year run of success is nothing short of astounding. The leading gross certainly suggests efficiency, while the longevity confirms resilience - a productive balance.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Attenborough: 'Curb excess capitalism' to save nature

Sir David Attenborough says the excesses of western countries should "be curbed" to restore the natural world and we'll all be happier for it.

The veteran broadcaster said that the standard of living in wealthy nations is going to have to take a pause.

Nature would flourish once again he believes when "those that have a great deal, perhaps, have a little less".

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

What can smallpox teach us about how we’ve managed COVID-19?

- Smallpox killed an estimated 300 million people in the 20th century alone.
- In 1980, smallpox was the first disease to be officially eradicated.
- Lessons from dealing with past pandemics apply to COVID-19.

For many global health decision-makers, COVID-19 has come to symbolize a failure to apply lessons from past experiences with infectious diseases and raised pressing new questions to be addressed ahead of the next pandemic.

I had the honor of being involved in the campaign to eradicate smallpox, a devastating disease whose historical names - pox, speckled monster and red plague - hint more clearly at the pain and suffering it caused hundreds of millions of people over centuries.

After a decades-long fight to prevent transmission and inoculate people the world over, the last known case of Variola major was diagnosed in a three-year-old Bangladeshi girl named Rahima Banu, and the last case of Variola minor in October 1977, in Somalia. The World Health Organization, which estimates the disease killed 300 million people in the 20th century alone, declared in 1980 that it was the first - and so far only - human disease to be eradicated globally.

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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