TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

An Economist's Guide to the World in 2050

Largely driven by the rise of China and India, the emerging-market share of global GDP is also soaring. In 2000, emerging markets accounted for about a fifth of global output. In 2042, they're set to overtake advanced economies as the biggest contributors to global GDP - and by 2050, they will contribute almost 60% of the total.

More viscerally felt will be the shift in relative power between countries. In 2033, according to our projections, India will overtake an age-hobbled Japan to become the world's third biggest economy. In 2035, China will outstrip the U.S. to become the biggest. By 2050, Indonesia may have moved into the big league. Three of the world's biggest economies will be Asian emerging markets.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Why the 'paradox mindset' is the key to success

Although paradoxes often trip us up, embracing contradictory ideas may actually be the secret to creativity and leadership.

Working life often involves the push and pull of various contradictory demands. Doctors and nurses need to provide highest quality healthcare at the lowest cost; musicians want to maintain their artistic integrity while also making a sack full of cash. A teacher has to impose toughdiscipline for the good of the class - being "cruel to be kind".

Being dragged in two different directions, simultaneously, should only create tension and stress. And yet some exciting and highly counter-intuitive research suggests that these conflicts can often work in our favour. Over a series of studies, psychologists and organisational scientists have found that people who learn to embrace, rather than reject, opposing demands show greater creativity, flexibility and productivity. The dual constraints actually enhance their performance.

The researchers call this a "paradox mindset" - and there never be a better time to start cultivating it.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Get 1% Better Every Day: The Kaizen Way to Self-Improvement

It's happened to all of us.

You have a "come to Jesus" moment and decide you need to make changes in your life. Maybe you need to drop a few pounds (or more), want to pay off some debt, or desperately long to quit wasting time on the internet.

So you start planning and scheming.

You take to your journal and write out a bold strategy on how you're going to tackle your quest for self-improvement. You set big, hairy SMART goals with firm deadlines. You download the apps and buy the gear that will help you reach your objectives.

You feel that telltale rush that comes with believing you're turning over a new leaf, and indeed, the first few days go great. "This time," you tell yourself, "this time is different."

But then ...

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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