TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

How to think for yourself

There are some kinds of work that you can't do well without thinking differently from your peers. To be a successful scientist, for example, it's not enough just to be correct. Your ideas have to be both correct and novel. You can't publish papers saying things other people already know. You need to say things no one else has realized yet.

The same is true for investors. It's not enough for a public market investor to predict correctly how a company will do. If a lot of other people make the same prediction, the stock price will already reflect it, and there's no room to make money. The only valuable insights are the ones most other investors don't share.

You see this pattern with startup founders too. You don't want to start a startup to do something that everyone agrees is a good idea, or there will already be other companies doing it. You have to do something that sounds to most other people like a bad idea, but that you know isn't - like writing software for a tiny computer used by a few thousand hobbyists, or starting a site to let people rent airbeds on strangers' floors.

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

India SaaS Report 2020 : An insight into the India SaaS ecosystem and the future roadmap for founders and investors

The Indian Software as a Service (SaaS) landscape is on the cusp of a transformation. Over the last five years, the number of funded SaaS companies has more than doubled and the number of SaaS companies drawing Series C or later stage capital has quadrupled, representing significant traction.

Indian SaaS companies have evolved from the rise of a few upstarts in the 2010s to a multibilliondollar industry today. The first group of Indian SaaS companies to emerge were horizontal players, such as Zoho and Freshworks, which leveraged India's cost and talent advantage to target global small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). Over time, several different archetypes of Indian SaaS companies have emerged. Today, Indian SaaS companies have different areas of focus, which can be classified across multiple vectors: 1) size of customer, 2) type of solution and 3) geography of focus.

First-gen founders, including Sridhar Vembu and Girish Mathrubootham, have played a pivotal role in India's SaaS journey. They actively engaged in building a community of budding entrepreneurs, resulting in the development of many new ventures and immense job creation. For example, Freshworks created an entrepreneurship cascade of more than 25 companies, including Voonik, Revv and SurveySparrow, which in turn have already created 500 to 1,000 jobs.

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

Be upfront if you need time to reply, and other tips for successful Email negotiations

Tactics for increasing B2B sales

When your own inbox is overflowing with unread messages, it may not seem like the best tactic but with the right approach, email can be a powerful negotiation tool, not least in the B2B realm. According to 2019 research by IACCM, a global contract management association, about 75 percent of contract negotiations are completely virtual.

Nowadays, many B2B sales negotiations involve an open bid process with a standardised communication where relationship bonds are less important. In that context, emails offer a number of advantages. For instance, they can be instantly accessed, often by many parties in an organisation, thus creating transparency. Emails also allow a rich diversity of materials to be used as attachments.

Negotiations via email can be particularly suitable when gender, age or racial biases - or linguistic issues such as a strong accent - could mar the process. It can also help when there is a power distance between parties or when some voices risk being unheard.

However, email communication requires a certain technique in order to maximise the chances of closing the deal. As email is so widely used, every salesperson is competing for buyers' attention. According to a study involving a top B2B manufacturer of customised equipment for heavy industry, a successful combination of influence tactics can increase buyers' interest and the likelihood of a contract.

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TradeBriefs: What's important, not just what's popular!

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