TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

How to Actually Achieve More in A Day than Most Normally Do in A Week

A comprehensive and actionable step-by-step guide

Yesterday was one of my most productive days ever.

I wrote 3 articles, segregated my important documents, meditated for 30 minutes, made my monthly investments, caught up with an old friend, banged out an amazing workout, and got to bed early.

My past self wouldn't have achieved that much in an entire week. In fact, even my present "normal" days put my erstwhile most productive days to shame.

I work a full-time job, write, work out, eat healthily, invest, read, sleep enough, play my guitar, spend time with loved ones, and constantly explore new things.

I neither have a timetable nor insane willpower. What I do have are honed systems, consistent habits, and optimized frameworks - and these are what have revolutionized my productivity.

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

How Moderna, Home Depot, and others are succeeding with AI

When pharmaceutical company Moderna announced the first clinical trial of a COVID-19 vaccine, it was a proud moment but not a surprising one for Dave Johnson, the company's chief data and artificial intelligence officer.

When Johnson joined the company in 2014, he helped put in place automated processes and AI algorithms to increase the number of small-scale messenger RNA (mRNA) needed to run clinical experiments. This groundwork contributed to Moderna releasing one of the first COVID-19 vaccines (using mRNA) even as the world had only started to understand the virus' threat.

"The whole COVID vaccine development, we're immensely proud of the work that we've done there, and we're immensely proud of the superhuman effort that our people went through to bring it to market so quickly," Johnson said during a bonus episode of the MIT Sloan Management Review podcast "Me, Myself, and AI."

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TradeBriefs Editorial

From the Editor's Desk

The power of no: how to build strong, healthy boundaries

When we find it difficult to say 'no' at work or at home, our responsibilities can quickly become overwhelming. For good mental health, focusing on our own needs and capabilities is crucial

No. A tiny, yet mighty word. To hear it can make us feel childlike; sheepish or in trouble. How does it make you feel to say "no"? Strong? Nervous? Guilty? Do you say it often enough?

In July, when the gymnast Simone Biles withdrew from most of her Olympics appearances, citing emotional exhaustion that was affecting her ability to perform, her "no" was a thunderbolt. Reactions were largely supportive, but opinions were divided along political lines in the US. White, male sports pundits (and, predictable as the arrow of time, Piers Morgan) used the word "selfish". It was a similar story when the tennis player Naomi Osaka withdrew from the French Open in May, speaking of "long bouts of depression" and "huge waves of anxiety" before her pre- and post-match press conferences.

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